Tuesday, March 24, 2009

Feast of St. Benedict


Visited Monte Cassino on Saturday, the feast of St. Benedict of Nursia in the real old calendar.


Quite a view from the top.


The monks continue to keep the feast on March 21st and a large number of other people know when the feast is too,


judging from the standing-room-only crowd at the Mass.


Lots of obviously very important people, surrounded by v. important policemen, in attendance.


When you go in the door marked "Pax", you then climb this stair that is lined with stone remnants of the old monastery and its ancient forbears.




The tympanum.


Bits of carved stone picked out of the rubble.



I had a brief visit to the gift shop and looked at a book on the WWII bombardment.


The photos of the devastation were shocking.


It seems simply astonishing that the monastery could have been so completely and splendidly restored.


This is the inner courtyard. I think the carving on top of the well is the original. At least it looks battered enough to be.


The little courtyard and cloister preceding the museum.



The view.


St. Benedict's doves.


Close enough to speak directly to God.


Italy has the best dressed policemen.


After the Mass, they kicked everyone out and we went to have some lunch.

There is a charming Italian restaurant in villa about half way down the mountain.



The inevitable Pics-of-Sonnen-taking-pics...


Gregory, Chris and Claire.


Farewell. (And please don't get bombed ever again!)

5 comments:

Kathleen said...

Whoa! Awesome---in the proper sense of the word! I love it when you post Italy pics---keep doing it!

BillyHW said...

Meanwhile, in T.O.

Anonymous said...

Lovely---I was just thinking about Monte Cassino too, and wondering what Thomas d'Aquino would have seen had he ever looked out the window when he was a Benedictine oblate---a lad of five. Or St. Philip. Thanks.

Fr. Thomas Trottier said...

Lovely---I was just thinking about Monte Cassino too, and wondering what Thomas d'Aquino would have seen had he ever looked out the window when he was a Benedictine oblate---a lad of five. Or St. Philip. Thanks.

M. Alexander said...

The first picture made me catch my breath. And I don't think I have properly caught it yet.

Beautiful!