Sunday, November 05, 2017

And all things go to one place: of earth they were made, and into earth they return together.

Terrace garden this afternoon, after a bit of rain. 


Nearest neighbours, two fields over. Fields planted with winter cover crops. Monte Subasio in the far distance. 

























It's November, it's grey and the leaves are falling, it's raining and thundering, and you're feeling melancholy, and all that is perfectly OK.



My little orto, a row of Romanesco broccoli, white cauliflower, red cabbage, red onions and cime di rapa, and a couple of rows of cilantro. 

For us melancholic introverts a day like this is just about the perfect day.







It's the month of the Holy Souls; the month in which the Church actually encourages you to feel gloomy and autumnal, to consider mortality and brood about the passing of all things in this life. We are not made for this world that is passing away.
























The Faith encompasses all possible human things; birth, joy and suffering, love, work, fruitfulness, old age and death, and the liturgical cycle is perfectly attuned to the natural annual cycle.

Embrace your inner melancholic.

Ecclesiastes 3

All things have their season, and in their times all things pass under heaven. 
A time to be born and a time to die. A time to plant, and a time to pluck up that which is planted. 
A time to kill, and a time to heal. A time to destroy, and a time to build. 
A time to weep, and a time to laugh. A time to mourn, and a time to dance. 
A time to scatter stones, and a time to gather. A time to embrace, and a time to be far from embraces. 
A time to get, and a time to lose. A time to keep, and a time to cast away. 
A time to rend, and a time to sew. A time to keep silence, and a time to speak. 
A time of love, and a time of hatred. A time of war, and a time of peace. 
What hath man more of his labour? 
I have seen the trouble, which God hath given the sons of men to be exercised in it. 
He hath made all things good in their time, and hath delivered the world to their consideration, so that man cannot find out the work which God hath made from the beginning to the end. 
And I have known that there was no better thing than to rejoice, and to do well in this life. 
For every man that eateth and drinketh, and seeth good of his labour, this is the gift of God. 
I have learned that all the works which God hath made, continue for ever: we cannot add any thing, nor take away from those things which God hath made that he may be feared. 
That which hath been made, the same continueth: the things that shall be, have already been: and God restoreth that which is past. 
I saw under the sun in the place of judgment wickedness, and in the place of justice iniquity.
And I said in my heart: God shall judge both the just and the wicked, and then shall be the time of every thing. 
I said in my heart concerning the sons of men, that God would prove them, and shew them to be like beasts. 
Therefore the death of man, and of beasts is one, and the condition of them both is equal: as man dieth, so they also die: all things breathe alike, and man hath nothing more than beast: all things are subject to vanity. 
And all things go to one place: of earth they were made, and into earth they return together.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

I love the stillness and solitude of winter.

Beautiful photos. Looks like paradise to me.

Lydia

Erik Dunleavy said...

It is great that you are back at "What's up." How do we post comments on What's Up?
What particularly disturbed me was seeing Cardinal Schonborn consecrating leavened bread and distributing it in wooden bowls. And this is the man who wrote the "new" Catechism?
God bless
Erik

thetimman said...

Beautiful post. Just the thing. Thank you.

Hilary Jane Margaret White said...

Erik,

I don't think I'm quite ready to deal with the constant headache of comments. People seem to be doing OK just Tweeting them or emailing or whatever. I'll think about it later.

Johanna Donovan said...

It's great to be reading you again, Hilary (WUWS).
Also enjoyed your article in "The Remnant".

Thank you!
jd